Striezelmarkt in Dresden

December 20, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

Dresdner Striezelmarkt  

Christmas Markets, a very German tradition and I love it. Not just because I am German, no I just love the lights, the music, the smell of mulled wine, cakes and sweets. There is nothing better to get in to the Christmas Spirit, then to stroll over one of these markets. And the Germans just know how to do it right. So every year, I am heading back for a week and getting in to the swing of Christmas, visiting the Weihnachtsmarkt, drinking Gluehwein and eating a Roster or Bratwurst. Singing Weihnachtslieder like "Oh du Froehliche" and "Oh du schoene Weihnachtszeit" with friends and family and lots of laughter.

Yes this is what Christmas is all about :) 

Dresdner Striezelmark | Dresden, GermanyDresdner Striezelmark | Dresden, GermanyThe Dresdner Striezelmark is one of Germany's oldest documented Christmas markets and also one of it's best. Founded as a one-day market in 1434, it celebrated its 580th anniversary in 2014.
This market was first mentioned in 1434, under Friedrich II, a King of Saxony, when it was held the Monday before Christmas on the Altmarkt square. Originally, the a one-day market was here to provide the citizens of Dresden with the meat for the Christmas meal after the pre-Christmas period of fasting.
Over the centuries the Striezelmarkt has developed into a huge event with 250 stands, taking up a large part of Dresden city centre and lasting throughout the Advent period until Christmas Eve. Today the Striezelmarkt attracts 3 million visitors a year from all over the world.
The word Striezelmarkt comes from Strüzel or Stroczel, which was the name of a type of cake sold at the market, now famous as Stollen or Christstollen, a light airy fruitcake. The real Dresden Stollen, however, is produced in the city and distinguished by a special seal depicting the city's famous king, August the Strong.
Today the most famous features of Dresden Striezelmarkt are the world's largest usable Christmas arch with a breadth of 13.5 metres and a height of more than 5 metres and the 14-metre high Erzgebirge Christmas pyramid.
Famous is the Pflaumentoffel, a chimney sweep's boy
Apart from the famous Stollen, other specialities originate from Dresden and were originally sold at the Striezelmarkt. Made of prunes, these little figures are really decorations, although they can be eaten after Christmas.
Pulsnitzer Pfefferkuchen
Pfefferkuchen literally means "pepper cake": the word "pepper" was used to mean any new foreign spice. The gingerbread sold at the Striezelmarkt comes from Pulsnitz, a town about 50 km from Dresden; it was first mentioned as a speciality from Pulsnitz in a decree issued in 1558 allowing bakers to produce it there. Pfefferkuchen are usually filled with marmalade or jam and covered with chocolate. Unlike gingerbread from other countries, the dough does not usually contain any fat, or indeed ginger, but instead nutmeg, cinnamon, ground cloves and allspice, which are added after the dough has been left up to 6 months to mature.
Glühwein or Mulled Wine
One very well-loved tradition on a cold December night in Dresden is drinking steaming mugs of mulled wine at the Striezelmarkt. The hot red wine spiced with cloves and cinnamon is served in specially decorated mugs.
The Dresdner Striezelmark is one of Germany's oldest documented Christmas markets and also one of it's best. Founded in 1434, it celebrated its 580th anniversary in 2014. 

The market was first mentioned in 1434, under Friedrich II, a King of Saxony, when it was held the Monday before Christmas on the Altmarkt square. Originally, the a one-day market was here to provide the citizens of Dresden with the meat for the Christmas meal after the pre-Christmas period of fasting.

Over the centuries the Striezelmarkt has developed into a huge event with 250 stands, taking up a large part of Dresden city centre and lasting throughout the Advent period until Christmas Eve. Today the Striezelmarkt attracts 3 million visitors a year from all over the world.

Dresdner Striezelmark | Dresden, GermanyDresdner Striezelmark | Dresden, GermanyThe Dresdner Striezelmark is one of Germany's oldest documented Christmas markets and also one of it's best. Founded as a one-day market in 1434, it celebrated its 580th anniversary in 2014.
This market was first mentioned in 1434, under Friedrich II, a King of Saxony, when it was held the Monday before Christmas on the Altmarkt square. Originally, the a one-day market was here to provide the citizens of Dresden with the meat for the Christmas meal after the pre-Christmas period of fasting.
Over the centuries the Striezelmarkt has developed into a huge event with 250 stands, taking up a large part of Dresden city centre and lasting throughout the Advent period until Christmas Eve. Today the Striezelmarkt attracts 3 million visitors a year from all over the world.
The word Striezelmarkt comes from Strüzel or Stroczel, which was the name of a type of cake sold at the market, now famous as Stollen or Christstollen, a light airy fruitcake. The real Dresden Stollen, however, is produced in the city and distinguished by a special seal depicting the city's famous king, August the Strong.
Today the most famous features of Dresden Striezelmarkt are the world's largest usable Christmas arch with a breadth of 13.5 metres and a height of more than 5 metres and the 14-metre high Erzgebirge Christmas pyramid.
Famous is the Pflaumentoffel, a chimney sweep's boy
Apart from the famous Stollen, other specialities originate from Dresden and were originally sold at the Striezelmarkt. Made of prunes, these little figures are really decorations, although they can be eaten after Christmas.
Pulsnitzer Pfefferkuchen
Pfefferkuchen literally means "pepper cake": the word "pepper" was used to mean any new foreign spice. The gingerbread sold at the Striezelmarkt comes from Pulsnitz, a town about 50 km from Dresden; it was first mentioned as a speciality from Pulsnitz in a decree issued in 1558 allowing bakers to produce it there. Pfefferkuchen are usually filled with marmalade or jam and covered with chocolate. Unlike gingerbread from other countries, the dough does not usually contain any fat, or indeed ginger, but instead nutmeg, cinnamon, ground cloves and allspice, which are added after the dough has been left up to 6 months to mature.
Glühwein or Mulled Wine
One very well-loved tradition on a cold December night in Dresden is drinking steaming mugs of mulled wine at the Striezelmarkt. The hot red wine spiced with cloves and cinnamon is served in specially decorated mugs.

The word Striezelmarkt comes from Strüzel or Stroczel, which was the name of a type of cake sold at the market, now famous as Stollen or Christstollen, a light airy fruitcake. The real Dresden Stollen, however, is produced in the city and distinguished by a special seal depicting the city's famous king, August the Strong. 

Today the most famous features of Dresden Striezelmarkt are the world's largest usable Christmas arch with a breadth of 13.5 metres and a height of more than 5 metres and the 14-metre high Erzgebirge Christmas pyramid. 

Famous is the Pflaumentoffel, a chimney sweep's boy
Apart from the famous Stollen, other specialities originate from Dresden and were originally sold at the Striezelmarkt. Made of prunes, these little figures are really decorations, although they can be eaten after Christmas. 

Dresdner Striezelmark | Dresden, GermanyDresdner Striezelmark | Dresden, GermanyThe Dresdner Striezelmark is one of Germany's oldest documented Christmas markets and also one of it's best. Founded as a one-day market in 1434, it celebrated its 580th anniversary in 2014.
This market was first mentioned in 1434, under Friedrich II, a King of Saxony, when it was held the Monday before Christmas on the Altmarkt square. Originally, the a one-day market was here to provide the citizens of Dresden with the meat for the Christmas meal after the pre-Christmas period of fasting.
Over the centuries the Striezelmarkt has developed into a huge event with 250 stands, taking up a large part of Dresden city centre and lasting throughout the Advent period until Christmas Eve. Today the Striezelmarkt attracts 3 million visitors a year from all over the world.
The word Striezelmarkt comes from Strüzel or Stroczel, which was the name of a type of cake sold at the market, now famous as Stollen or Christstollen, a light airy fruitcake. The real Dresden Stollen, however, is produced in the city and distinguished by a special seal depicting the city's famous king, August the Strong.
Today the most famous features of Dresden Striezelmarkt are the world's largest usable Christmas arch with a breadth of 13.5 metres and a height of more than 5 metres and the 14-metre high Erzgebirge Christmas pyramid.
Famous is the Pflaumentoffel, a chimney sweep's boy
Apart from the famous Stollen, other specialities originate from Dresden and were originally sold at the Striezelmarkt. Made of prunes, these little figures are really decorations, although they can be eaten after Christmas.
Pulsnitzer Pfefferkuchen
Pfefferkuchen literally means "pepper cake": the word "pepper" was used to mean any new foreign spice. The gingerbread sold at the Striezelmarkt comes from Pulsnitz, a town about 50 km from Dresden; it was first mentioned as a speciality from Pulsnitz in a decree issued in 1558 allowing bakers to produce it there. Pfefferkuchen are usually filled with marmalade or jam and covered with chocolate. Unlike gingerbread from other countries, the dough does not usually contain any fat, or indeed ginger, but instead nutmeg, cinnamon, ground cloves and allspice, which are added after the dough has been left up to 6 months to mature.
Glühwein or Mulled Wine
One very well-loved tradition on a cold December night in Dresden is drinking steaming mugs of mulled wine at the Striezelmarkt. The hot red wine spiced with cloves and cinnamon is served in specially decorated mugs.

Dresdner Striezelmark | Dresden, GermanyDresdner Striezelmark | Dresden, GermanyThe Dresdner Striezelmark is one of Germany's oldest documented Christmas markets and also one of it's best. Founded as a one-day market in 1434, it celebrated its 580th anniversary in 2014.
This market was first mentioned in 1434, under Friedrich II, a King of Saxony, when it was held the Monday before Christmas on the Altmarkt square. Originally, the a one-day market was here to provide the citizens of Dresden with the meat for the Christmas meal after the pre-Christmas period of fasting.
Over the centuries the Striezelmarkt has developed into a huge event with 250 stands, taking up a large part of Dresden city centre and lasting throughout the Advent period until Christmas Eve. Today the Striezelmarkt attracts 3 million visitors a year from all over the world.
The word Striezelmarkt comes from Strüzel or Stroczel, which was the name of a type of cake sold at the market, now famous as Stollen or Christstollen, a light airy fruitcake. The real Dresden Stollen, however, is produced in the city and distinguished by a special seal depicting the city's famous king, August the Strong.
Today the most famous features of Dresden Striezelmarkt are the world's largest usable Christmas arch with a breadth of 13.5 metres and a height of more than 5 metres and the 14-metre high Erzgebirge Christmas pyramid.
Famous is the Pflaumentoffel, a chimney sweep's boy
Apart from the famous Stollen, other specialities originate from Dresden and were originally sold at the Striezelmarkt. Made of prunes, these little figures are really decorations, although they can be eaten after Christmas.
Pulsnitzer Pfefferkuchen
Pfefferkuchen literally means "pepper cake": the word "pepper" was used to mean any new foreign spice. The gingerbread sold at the Striezelmarkt comes from Pulsnitz, a town about 50 km from Dresden; it was first mentioned as a speciality from Pulsnitz in a decree issued in 1558 allowing bakers to produce it there. Pfefferkuchen are usually filled with marmalade or jam and covered with chocolate. Unlike gingerbread from other countries, the dough does not usually contain any fat, or indeed ginger, but instead nutmeg, cinnamon, ground cloves and allspice, which are added after the dough has been left up to 6 months to mature.
Glühwein or Mulled Wine
One very well-loved tradition on a cold December night in Dresden is drinking steaming mugs of mulled wine at the Striezelmarkt. The hot red wine spiced with cloves and cinnamon is served in specially decorated mugs.

 The one with the red hair is me, testing Mulled Wine :) Highly recommended.  Dresdner Striezelmark | Dresden, GermanyDresdner Striezelmark | Dresden, GermanyThe Dresdner Striezelmark is one of Germany's oldest documented Christmas markets and also one of it's best. Founded as a one-day market in 1434, it celebrated its 580th anniversary in 2014.
This market was first mentioned in 1434, under Friedrich II, a King of Saxony, when it was held the Monday before Christmas on the Altmarkt square. Originally, the a one-day market was here to provide the citizens of Dresden with the meat for the Christmas meal after the pre-Christmas period of fasting.
Over the centuries the Striezelmarkt has developed into a huge event with 250 stands, taking up a large part of Dresden city centre and lasting throughout the Advent period until Christmas Eve. Today the Striezelmarkt attracts 3 million visitors a year from all over the world.
The word Striezelmarkt comes from Strüzel or Stroczel, which was the name of a type of cake sold at the market, now famous as Stollen or Christstollen, a light airy fruitcake. The real Dresden Stollen, however, is produced in the city and distinguished by a special seal depicting the city's famous king, August the Strong.
Today the most famous features of Dresden Striezelmarkt are the world's largest usable Christmas arch with a breadth of 13.5 metres and a height of more than 5 metres and the 14-metre high Erzgebirge Christmas pyramid.
Famous is the Pflaumentoffel, a chimney sweep's boy
Apart from the famous Stollen, other specialities originate from Dresden and were originally sold at the Striezelmarkt. Made of prunes, these little figures are really decorations, although they can be eaten after Christmas.
Pulsnitzer Pfefferkuchen
Pfefferkuchen literally means "pepper cake": the word "pepper" was used to mean any new foreign spice. The gingerbread sold at the Striezelmarkt comes from Pulsnitz, a town about 50 km from Dresden; it was first mentioned as a speciality from Pulsnitz in a decree issued in 1558 allowing bakers to produce it there. Pfefferkuchen are usually filled with marmalade or jam and covered with chocolate. Unlike gingerbread from other countries, the dough does not usually contain any fat, or indeed ginger, but instead nutmeg, cinnamon, ground cloves and allspice, which are added after the dough has been left up to 6 months to mature.
Glühwein or Mulled Wine
One very well-loved tradition on a cold December night in Dresden is drinking steaming mugs of mulled wine at the Striezelmarkt. The hot red wine spiced with cloves and cinnamon is served in specially decorated mugs.

Pulsnitzer Pfefferkuchen 
Pfefferkuchen literally means "pepper cake": the word "pepper" was used to mean any new foreign spice. The gingerbread sold at the Striezelmarkt comes from Pulsnitz, a town about 50 km from Dresden; it was first mentioned as a speciality from Pulsnitz in a decree issued in 1558 allowing bakers to produce it there. Pfefferkuchen are usually filled with marmalade or jam and covered with chocolate. Unlike gingerbread from other countries, the dough does not usually contain any fat, or indeed ginger, but instead nutmeg, cinnamon, ground cloves and allspice, which are added after the dough has been left up to 6 months to mature. 

Glühwein or Mulled Wine
One very well-loved tradition on a cold December night in Dresden is drinking steaming mugs of mulled wine at the Striezelmarkt. The hot red wine spiced with cloves and cinnamon is served in specially decorated mugs.

Dresdner Striezelmark | Dresden, GermanyDresdner Striezelmark | Dresden, GermanyThe Dresdner Striezelmark is one of Germany's oldest documented Christmas markets and also one of it's best. Founded as a one-day market in 1434, it celebrated its 580th anniversary in 2014.
This market was first mentioned in 1434, under Friedrich II, a King of Saxony, when it was held the Monday before Christmas on the Altmarkt square. Originally, the a one-day market was here to provide the citizens of Dresden with the meat for the Christmas meal after the pre-Christmas period of fasting.
Over the centuries the Striezelmarkt has developed into a huge event with 250 stands, taking up a large part of Dresden city centre and lasting throughout the Advent period until Christmas Eve. Today the Striezelmarkt attracts 3 million visitors a year from all over the world.
The word Striezelmarkt comes from Strüzel or Stroczel, which was the name of a type of cake sold at the market, now famous as Stollen or Christstollen, a light airy fruitcake. The real Dresden Stollen, however, is produced in the city and distinguished by a special seal depicting the city's famous king, August the Strong.
Today the most famous features of Dresden Striezelmarkt are the world's largest usable Christmas arch with a breadth of 13.5 metres and a height of more than 5 metres and the 14-metre high Erzgebirge Christmas pyramid.
Famous is the Pflaumentoffel, a chimney sweep's boy
Apart from the famous Stollen, other specialities originate from Dresden and were originally sold at the Striezelmarkt. Made of prunes, these little figures are really decorations, although they can be eaten after Christmas.
Pulsnitzer Pfefferkuchen
Pfefferkuchen literally means "pepper cake": the word "pepper" was used to mean any new foreign spice. The gingerbread sold at the Striezelmarkt comes from Pulsnitz, a town about 50 km from Dresden; it was first mentioned as a speciality from Pulsnitz in a decree issued in 1558 allowing bakers to produce it there. Pfefferkuchen are usually filled with marmalade or jam and covered with chocolate. Unlike gingerbread from other countries, the dough does not usually contain any fat, or indeed ginger, but instead nutmeg, cinnamon, ground cloves and allspice, which are added after the dough has been left up to 6 months to mature.
Glühwein or Mulled Wine
One very well-loved tradition on a cold December night in Dresden is drinking steaming mugs of mulled wine at the Striezelmarkt. The hot red wine spiced with cloves and cinnamon is served in specially decorated mugs.
Dresdner Striezelmark | Dresden, GermanyDresdner Striezelmark | Dresden, GermanyThe Dresdner Striezelmark is one of Germany's oldest documented Christmas markets and also one of it's best. Founded as a one-day market in 1434, it celebrated its 580th anniversary in 2014.
This market was first mentioned in 1434, under Friedrich II, a King of Saxony, when it was held the Monday before Christmas on the Altmarkt square. Originally, the a one-day market was here to provide the citizens of Dresden with the meat for the Christmas meal after the pre-Christmas period of fasting.
Over the centuries the Striezelmarkt has developed into a huge event with 250 stands, taking up a large part of Dresden city centre and lasting throughout the Advent period until Christmas Eve. Today the Striezelmarkt attracts 3 million visitors a year from all over the world.
The word Striezelmarkt comes from Strüzel or Stroczel, which was the name of a type of cake sold at the market, now famous as Stollen or Christstollen, a light airy fruitcake. The real Dresden Stollen, however, is produced in the city and distinguished by a special seal depicting the city's famous king, August the Strong.
Today the most famous features of Dresden Striezelmarkt are the world's largest usable Christmas arch with a breadth of 13.5 metres and a height of more than 5 metres and the 14-metre high Erzgebirge Christmas pyramid.
Famous is the Pflaumentoffel, a chimney sweep's boy
Apart from the famous Stollen, other specialities originate from Dresden and were originally sold at the Striezelmarkt. Made of prunes, these little figures are really decorations, although they can be eaten after Christmas.
Pulsnitzer Pfefferkuchen
Pfefferkuchen literally means "pepper cake": the word "pepper" was used to mean any new foreign spice. The gingerbread sold at the Striezelmarkt comes from Pulsnitz, a town about 50 km from Dresden; it was first mentioned as a speciality from Pulsnitz in a decree issued in 1558 allowing bakers to produce it there. Pfefferkuchen are usually filled with marmalade or jam and covered with chocolate. Unlike gingerbread from other countries, the dough does not usually contain any fat, or indeed ginger, but instead nutmeg, cinnamon, ground cloves and allspice, which are added after the dough has been left up to 6 months to mature.
Glühwein or Mulled Wine
One very well-loved tradition on a cold December night in Dresden is drinking steaming mugs of mulled wine at the Striezelmarkt. The hot red wine spiced with cloves and cinnamon is served in specially decorated mugs.

Bridget Davey Photography

www.bridgetdavey.com

Professsional Photography Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire & London 

 

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